Providing Expert Lawn Care to Aurora, Parker, Castle Rock, Castle Pines, Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree & Surrounding Areas.
QDS Logo

95%

Customer Satisfaction

from 1988 reviews


   69%
   17.8%
   8%
   3.1%
   2.1%
Customer Rating


Posts By:

Bees get thirsty too

Bees get thirsty too

Next week is Pollinator Week, when we celebrate all that the many types of pollinators—bees, butterflies, birds, bats, flies and more—do for us. It’s a good time to think of ways you can support your local pollinators. Remember that when it’s hot outside, pollinators get thirsty too.

Offer pollinators a sip of water

There are several ways to provide water for your pollinators, including:

  • Provide a shallow puddle for butterflies, which practice “puddling” in order to get nutrients from mud or rotting plant matter. Just a tiny spot will do, though you’ll need to replenish water as it evaporates. You can use a small saucer and add sand, a bit of compost, and water.
  • Create a bee watering station by filling a saucer or pie plate with rocks or marbles and adding water. Don’t entirely cover the rocks with water; bees will perch on the rocks and go to the water’s edge for a drink.
  • Put out a birdbath. A wide, shallow birdbath is best, especially for smaller birds.

Important: Don’t create large standing water in your landscape, which invites mosquitos. And whichever water source you put out, be sure to clean it and refill it. You may notice that the bees, birds, and other animals will learn where the water source is. They’ll come back when they get thirsty again, so make sure the water source is ready with clean, fresh water.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Cycle and soak

Cycle and soak

As temperatures rise, you may be tempted to run your sprinkler longer. But resist that temptation, and instead practice cycle-and-soak watering. It’s an efficient way to keep your landscape healthy and be sure that none of your watering goes to waste.

Here’s how to cycle and soak:

  • Break up your watering into shorter intervals. For example, if you usually water an area of lawn for about 15 minutes, then don’t apply all the water within one 15-minute timeframe. Watering all at once creates run-off and wasted water your plants won’t get to use.
  • Instead, break the watering time into three intervals so that the water runs for about 5 minutes, and then take a break. This break gives the water time to soak into the soil. It is easy to schedule these cycle-and-soak intervals with the timer on your sprinkler system. By the time each zone has received water, the first zone has had time to absorb the first interval’s water and is ready for the next interval.
  • Need help programming the cycle-and soak method? Check the manual, look for a video online that walks you through the steps, or consult a landscape professional to help you troubleshoot your turf issues and properly schedule your sprinkler.
  • When scheduling your sprinklers, make sure you’re following any watering rules for your area. They can help you establish good habits and not over-water your lawn. For example, most watering rules prohibit watering midday, which is an excellent guideline since you can lose a lot of irrigation water to evaporation during those hours.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Five benefits of mulch

benefits of mulch

It’s getting warmer across Colorado, and our plants will need more water. But just because the drought is over on the Front Range—for now—doesn’t mean we shouldn’t still try to conserve water. The Western Slope, which provides much of our water supply, is still in drought. And our own next drought could be just around the corner. We should give the plants the water they need but not waste a drop.

One way to save water and dress up the landscape in the process is to top dress bed areas with mulch. And there is nothing better to use than fresh, 100% organic wood mulch.

Here are five great reasons to use wood mulch:

  • Seasonal mulching decreases evaporation rates from the soil by as much as 35 percent, so your water use is more efficient.
  • Mulching suppresses weed growth. If there are fewer weeds in your yard, there are fewer plants competing with your landscape plants for nutrients and moisture. That’s another water savings.
  • A healthy layer of mulch insulates plants and helps protect their roots from the extreme temperature shifts we experience in Colorado.
  • As mulch breaks down, it becomes nutritious organic matter, which promotes future healthy growth.
  • It looks great. Mulch creates an even appearance across the landscape and provides year-round color, texture and interest.

Mulches recycled from local pruning debris can be put back into the landscape as a healthy amendment. Locally sourced mulch is a sustainable option, supporting the local economy and lessening the carbon footprint. Because it is derived from organic material, it settles onto the soil and does not blow away like mulch that has been recycled from treated wood products such as pallets. It must, however, first be watered in so that it settles. A landscape professional can help you choose the right mulch and apply it properly for the most benefits.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Plant some sunshine

plant some sunflowers
  • There’s still time to plant some sunflowers in your landscape. The National Garden Bureau named 2021 the Year of the Sunflower, and with good reason. This cheerful plant is always a popular cut flower, and it’s rather easy to grow.

Some facts about sunflowers:

  • They are native to North America, so they are well-suited to grow here.
  • They provide both nectar and seeds, making them a great plant for pollinators.
  • The flowers move to face the sun, a process called heliotropism.

According to CSU’s PlantTalk, sunflower care is simple. They do best in full sun for 6+ hours each day and should be planted approximately 6-12” apart. Since many sunflower varieties are natives, they are often drought tolerant. Water deeply but infrequently for best results.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Prep for hail

Late spring is hail season in Colorado. It’s good to know what precautions you can take ahead of time and what you can do for plants after hail has dealt its blows.

Minimize damage if you can

  • Be prepared by placing buckets or old planting pots close to the garden so you can grab them quickly to cover plants when a storm rolls in, or set them in place before you go to bed if you expect a storm overnight.
  • Put heavy container plants that are beyond the patio or porch roof on wheeled bases so they can easily be moved under cover.
  • Have copper soap or a similar copper fungicide on hand to spray on plants right after the damage. It keeps fungus from getting into the open wounds. Just like you put antiseptic on a cut finger, you need to apply it ASAP—within minutes or a few hours after the storm for the best effect.

Hail-damaged veggies and annuals

When plants are shredded by hail, do remedial work. You should prune off shredded leaves and broken stems on most plants. Here are some specifics:

  • Flowering annuals with no remaining foliage will probably not recover and should be replanted. If there is some foliage left on petunias, they may survive. When they are damaged early in the season, there is time for them to recover so it’s worth trying to nurse them back to health.
  • Early vegetable root crops such as carrots left without foliage won’t recover. They need green leaves to produce energy to grow.
  • Leafy vegetables may recover, but if you see no signs of new growth after a week or so, replant.

How to trim back damaged plants

  • Keep as many of the remaining leaves as possible. If half or more of the leaf is intact, keep it at least a little while so it can create energy for the plant.
  • Remove branches, leaves and stems that are broken or badly shredded.
  • If the top of a plant is shredded—for example, a tomato plant—clip the plant down to where there are healthy leaves.
  • Spray the cuts or broken places as soon as possible with a copper product. Copper, commonly found in fungicides, will help keep diseases from entering the plants. Caution: read the label before applying any product on veggies.
  • Wait to fertilize for a week or so when the plant shows signs of new growth. Use a liquid or granular fertilizer.
  • Minimize stress on the plants by watering consistently and evenly without over- or under-watering.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Keep weeds in check

Keep weeds in check

What is a weed? It’s any plant that grows where we don’t want it. Often they are non-native, potentially invasive plants that can outgrow and crowd out the plants we put in our landscape on purpose.

  • To avoid a big problem in the height of the growing season, take some time to stop weeds as soon as they appear. The key is to get rid of them before they flower or go to seed.
  • There are two basic methods of weed control: hand pulling and spraying them.
  • Hand pulling weeds
  • If the ground is still moist from rain, pulling weeds becomes much easier and you should be able to remove the root easily. If you only remove the top part of the weed but leave the root in the ground, it will soon grow back.
  • At the end of a weed-pulling project, there’s great satisfaction in seeing the nicely cleaned bed areas and the big stack of weeds that are no longer in your yard. But hand-pulling weeds is not a one-time effort—you’ll need to keep an eye out for those left-behind roots sprouting and for weeds that come in on the wind and try to make a new home in your landscape.
  • Spraying weeds
  • Applying a weed-killer product is another option and is most effective when sprayed on small, newly emerging weeds. Trying to pull out short weeds often ends up with them breaking and leaving the root in the ground to regrow. Taller weeds that are sprayed will eventually turn brown and will still need to be pulled out and removed.
  • Use the proper treatment on the right weed. Before applying any weed killer, read the label, pay attention to safety precautions and pollinator information and know the difference between the two basic types of products. Better still, rely on a landscape professional to with proper training and licensing to use weed killers safely and most effectively.
  • Don’t expect to become weed-free
  • For many weeds, total eradication is unlikely. For example, if your neighbor lets dandelions bloom, you won’t be able to keep them from popping up in your landscape. You’ll need to determine how many unwanted plants you can tolerate seeing when choosing your weed control method.

Remember that a healthy landscape is your best defense against weeds. Encourage the plants you want by keeping them healthy so that they can establish themselves and push out weeds by claiming their real estate.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Give a gift that lives on

hanging baskets

Cut flowers fade and die soon after gifting them. Why not give Mom—or any special person in your life—a gift that will give them joy for more than a week?

  • Container gardens
  • Plants in containers and hanging baskets are great for small spaces and larger landscapes alike. They can create a pop of color on a porch or patio, and they can be moved easily. They can even be brought indoors if the temperatures dip toward frost or a spring hailstorm hits.
  • Local garden centers offer ready-made container combinations with bright annuals that are sure to bring a smile to your loved one’s face. Or you can design a container that is customized to their tastes—whether it’s with favorite colors or edible plants. Annual flowers, veggie containers and herb gardens can all be grown easily in containers on porches and backyard patios or balconies in garden-level apartments or high-rise condos.
  • Hanging baskets
  • For even more space-saving ability, consider a hanging basket. If your loved one doesn’t have a green thumb, there are plenty of low-maintenance houseplants or succulent options in containers. Even small cactus and succulent gardens can still provide color. Not only do many have colorful blooms, but the plants themselves can be found in shades of red, pink, blue, and violet.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

FREE INSTANT DOWNLOAD

6 Secrets to a Lush, Green Lawn!

x