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Know your zone

In this post, we will be learning about the hardiness zone while you plan your landscape.

It’s often said that the key to successful, sustainable plants is putting the right plant in the right place. But first, you need to know your place. That begins by learning your hardiness zone while you plan your landscape.

This USDA system divides the US into 13 plant hardiness zones—including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico—based on the average annual extreme minimum temperature of a region. It’s a rough guide to helping gardeners and landscape professionals choose plants that will grow well in their area.

Much of Colorado falls into zones 4-6, though Colorado’s fruit-growing area near Grand Junction can cross into zone 7.

  • Stay in your zone

Look for these numbers when buying seeds or plants for your landscape. Be realistic; you won’t be successful growing Zone 10 avocadoes in your Front Range backyard. But native plants like rudbeckia hirta, aka black-eyed Susan (pictured above), can add hardy color to your landscape.

Keep in mind that hardiness zone labels can cause some confusion in the Rocky Mountain region. A plant sold as a “perennial” in a big chain store may grow as a perennial in its home zone, but in Colorado zones they would be an annual. Examples include chrysanthemums and verbena.

  • Zones don’t tell the whole story

Plant health depends on more than just temperature. Soil quality, sun, wind, and drainage can all affect the success of a plant—even if it is labeled for your zone. Keep these variations in mind, and you’ll set yourself and your garden up for success in the growing season.

Of course, consulting with a landscape professional will help you make sense of zones and find the right plants. You can also consider Plant Select, which develops plants that often have low water requirements and are well-suited to Colorado’s harsh growing conditions. Any reliable plant source should be able to provide the zone information to help you make your choices.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Your trees are thirsty

In this post, we will discuss about how to make sure the roots and canopy get the right amount of water.

Trees are one of the most valuable assets in a landscape. With the ongoing drought in Colorado, winter watering is more important than ever to preserve your investment. It’s a good rule of thumb to water your trees twice per month in winter.

A tree’s roots grow horizontally and can spread 2-4 times wider than the height of the tree, and wider than the tree’s canopy. Here’s how to make sure the roots and canopy get the right amount of water:

  • Water should be applied within the entire canopy of the tree.
  • Water deeply and slowly to many locations under the canopy.
  • To assure the survival of a tree, apply 10 gallons of water for each inch of the tree’s diameter, measured at knee height. per watering.
  • Apply mulch within the canopy at a depth of 3-4 inches, leaving 6 inches between the mulch and trunk.

As long as daytime temps are above freezing and the soil is not frozen, you can water your trees.

If this seems too complicated to do yourself, contact a landscape professional to help you. They can use a deep-root watering device, which is the best way to get the water deep into the soil where roots live.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Order now for spring

In this post, we will discuss about what you want in your garden this summer.

Winter officially began just a few weeks ago, but it’s already time to think about what you want in your garden this summer. Last year, gardening supply companies and garden centers experienced a huge spike in demand for seeds, plants, and other gardening needs. Experts expect that demand to continue in 2021, and some suppliers have already sold out of some seed varieties.

If you have dreams of a vegetable garden this summer or have specific desires for flower varieties in your landscape, now is the time to plan. During these cold months, it can be a comforting act to grab a mug of coffee, cocoa, or tea and settle in with a catalog or a web browser pointed to your favourite supplier. Browse the options, plan your garden, and place your request now to be sure your landscape is filled with your favourite plants.

Not sure what will thrive in your backyard conditions? Now is the time to consult a landscape professional about a design that is best for your property. Don’t wait until schedules are booked and supplies are low.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Winter lawn care

In this post, here are guidelines from CSU on when and how to water this winter.

Dry conditions across Colorado mean you’ll need to drag out the hose and sprinkler and water your landscape this winter. Snowfall usually provides far less moisture than rain, so you should supplement with winter watering when the ground is not frozen.

Follow these guidelines from CSU on when and how to water this winter:

  • Water when air and soil temperatures are above 40 degrees with no snow cover.
  • Water mid-day so that the water doesn’t freeze overnight and cause damage.
  • Watering one or two times per month, depending on conditions, is usually sufficient. Water long enough so that the soil is thoroughly soaked without run-off. Use the cycle-and-soak method for sloped areas.

If you aren’t able to hand-water your landscape this winter, hire a landscape pro to do the work for you. It’s a good investment in the long-term value of your property.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Plants of the year

In this post, we will tell you about five plants of the year

The National Garden Bureau once again chose five plants of the year. For 2021, they have chosen hibiscus (shrub), monarda or bee balm (perennial), hyacinth (bulb crop), garden bean (edible), and sunflower (annual). Plants are chosen because they are popular, easy-to-grow, widely adaptable, genetically diverse, and versatile.

Take some time this winter to explore the options for adding these trendy plants to your garden.

  • Hardy hibiscus might be a challenge for Colorado gardeners as they have greater water needs. Look for the Summerific® variety for the best results.
  • Native monarda fistulosa, aka wild bergamot, will add fragrance and keep pollinators happy.
  • Hyacinth bulbs are prized for their fragrant blossoms. It’s too late to plant for this spring but keep them in mind for fall planting.
  • Garden beans are a wide category. Options for edible bean crops include native Anasazi or Christmas beans, hardy pinto beans, or bush green beans.
  • Sunflowers might be the trendiest plant of the bunch. Whether you plant native Colorado sunflowers or mammoth varieties for their tasty seeds, they are sure to make a splash in your landscape.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Winter plant care

In this post, we will discuss how to take care of indoor plants during the winter.

Plants are a great living gift during the holidays. Be sure you know how to adjust indoor plant care during the winter, and your houseplants will keep bringing you joy well into the new year.

Poinsettias will last a long time indoors with good, bright light. Cyclamen is also a popular flowering plant for gifting during the holidays that do well in cooler temperatures. Keep it in a bright, cool window and enjoy its winter blooms.

For most tropical houseplants, follow these guidelines:

  • Keep them warm. Put them in a room with a steady temperature of 60-75 degrees.
  • Avoid temperature swings. Don’t keep them near cold, drafty windows or heat sources like fireplaces or radiators.
  • Make sure they get plenty of sunlight. Their usual spot may not get as much light in the winter, so you may need to move them to a sunnier windowsill.
  • Waterless and ease up on the fertilizer. Like us, plants slow down in winter. They won’t need as much water, and they may not need any fertilizer at all.

If you want to be a hands-on “pet parent,” wipe down their leaves with a damp cloth instead. Since homes can be dry in winter, your tropical plants may also benefit from a little mist of water or a humidifier.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Safe holiday decorating

In this post, we will discuss about the touch of nature and beauty to Christmas decor.

Live plants are a beautiful addition to your holiday décor. Wreaths of evergreen, eucalyptus, or herbs add a touch of nature and fragrance to your home, and the scent of a fresh evergreen tree really adds to the Christmas ambience.

Make the holidays safe

Safety is important, too. Keep your live wreaths and cut trees properly watered to avoid a fire hazard. And if your household has curious kids or critters who may chew on plants, avoid these popular holiday plants:

  • Amaryllis plants are very toxic and the bulb more so.
  • American holly has potentially toxic compounds that can cause gastrointestinal irritation.
  • Mistletoe berries and leaves can cause mild gastritis—but the most serious threat to pets is the plastic berries often included in the package. Many holiday vet visits are due to pets ingesting these berries. Plastic berries also pose a choking hazard to curious kiddos.
  • Kalanchoe, a flowering succulent, is popular at the holidays because of its showy blooms. It, too, can cause gastrointestinal problems for pets. The flowers can cause kidney failure in cats, which can be deadly.

What about poinsettias? 

Despite what you may have heard, poinsettias are not poisonous. According to WebMD and Mayo Clinic, the poinsettia can cause a skin rash or cause nausea/vomiting in children or pets but they are not deadly. People with latex allergies or certain food allergies (avocado, chestnut, kiwi, banana, passion fruit) are more likely to have an allergic reaction to the poinsettia. But as long as you keep them out of reach of children and pets, poinsettias are a beautiful choice for holiday decorating.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Trendy color for your landscape

In this post, we have mentioned about the trendy yet comforting color combination of flowers for your landscape.

 

This week, Pantone® announced that it had chosen two colors for 2021 Color of the Year. Pantone chose them as colors of a solid foundation (Ultimate Gray, reminiscent of rock or concrete) and of cheerfulness and hope (Illuminating’s sunny yellow).

For the landscape, there is great potential for incorporating this trendy yet comforting color combination. Plant Select® has introduced a new shrub for 2021, SteppeSuns® Hokubetsi (pictured above, photo courtesy Plant Select), with silver leaves and yellow flowers that fits the bill. It can survive extreme temperatures, is deer resistant, and is pollinator-friendly. Plant Select plants are well-suited to Colorado’s unique conditions.

There is no shortage of sunny, yellow flower options for your landscape throughout the growing season:

  • Tulips
  • Daffodils
  • Yellow primrose
  • Black-eyed susan
  • Sunflowers
  • Gold currant

The warmth of Illuminating would also look great in a gray container. Gray concrete or other hardscape provides a muted background for potted plants in this hopeful, positive color.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

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