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Posts Tagged: landscapes

Add some plants

Add some plants

The hottest days of the summer are over, and things should be cooling down soon. It’s a good time to add plants to our landscapes. Since irrigation systems will still be running for a couple more months, there’s time to water new plants and help them get established before winter.

  • Planting now gives new plants a head-start on next growing season. When spring comes around, they’ll be established and ready to take off and grow.
  • Choose the right plants. Look for plants that can thrive in Colorado. Our elevation and at times harsh environment can be a challenge for plants. And with ever-present drought, it’s important to choose plants with low water requirements. Don’t limit yourself to flowering perennials, either. Consider adding trees or shrubs to your landscape, too.
  • Be flexible. A local nursery or garden center or a landscape professional can guide you to plants that will enhance your landscape despite the challenges. But have a few choices in mind; supplies may be limited. Many have turned to gardening and renovating their landscapes during the pandemic, and growers can’t make new plants overnight.

Follow this checklist when establishing plants now or any time of year:

  • Place plants according to the micro-environments within your landscape. Match plant needs to locations in the yard that provide sun or shade, good or poor drainage, shelter from buildings, etc.
  • Know how large plants will be at maturity and avoid placing soon-to-be large plants too close together. Give them the space they need to grow without being overcrowded.
  • Group plants with similar water requirements together so you can water them efficiently without over-watering some or under-watering others.
  • Remember that even very low-water plants require regular drinks of water to become established. Make sure they get established before cutting back to little to no water.
  • Place mulch around newly planted trees, shrubs and perennials to help retain moisture.
  • After the sprinkler system is winterized, check plants regularly and water as needed especially during times with little or no precipitation.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Heat and smoky skies continue

Record-breaking high temperatures aren’t the best conditions for growing vegetables. The heat, and smoke from wildfires, aren’t good for the gardener, either. Take care of your garden and yourself with these tips.  Caring for heat-stressed veggies  •	Check soil moisture often and water so soil remains uniformly moist.  •	If your plants wilt during the hottest part of the day, know that this is their way of coping with the heat. You should see them perk up in the evening as temps cool.  •	Apply mulch around plants to keep the soil cool and to retain moisture.   Heat safety tips for humans •	Avoid working in your garden during the midday heat. Harvest your veggies in the morning when it is cooler.  •	Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water.  •	Try to work in the shade. A hat with a wide brim can protect your face.  •	If you wear a mask, remember that cotton is more breathable than synthetic fabrics.  •	If your mask has a filter pocket, a PM2.5 filter can add some protection on days of poor air quality due to smoke.   Our landscapes can be an extension of our homes and a place to socialize and relax. But if the temperatures are high and air quality is low, it’s better for your health to spend a little more time indoors until conditions improve.

Record-breaking high temperatures aren’t the best conditions for growing vegetables. The heat, and smoke from wildfires, aren’t good for the gardener, either. Take care of your garden and yourself with these tips.

Caring for heat-stressed veggies

  • Check soil moisture often and water so soil remains uniformly moist.
  • If your plants wilt during the hottest part of the day, know that this is their way of coping with the heat. You should see them perk up in the evening as temps cool.
  • Apply mulch around plants to keep the soil cool and to retain moisture.

Heat safety tips for humans

  • Avoid working in your garden during the midday heat. Harvest your veggies in the morning when it is cooler.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water.
  • Try to work in the shade. A hat with a wide brim can protect your face.
  • If you wear a mask, remember that cotton is more breathable than synthetic fabrics.
  • If your mask has a filter pocket, a PM2.5 filter can add some protection on days of poor air quality due to smoke.

Our landscapes can be an extension of our homes and a place to socialize and relax. But if the temperatures are high and air quality is low, it’s better for your health to spend a little more time indoors until conditions improve.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Give a gift that lives on

hanging baskets

Cut flowers fade and die soon after gifting them. Why not give Mom—or any special person in your life—a gift that will give them joy for more than a week?

  • Container gardens
  • Plants in containers and hanging baskets are great for small spaces and larger landscapes alike. They can create a pop of color on a porch or patio, and they can be moved easily. They can even be brought indoors if the temperatures dip toward frost or a spring hailstorm hits.
  • Local garden centers offer ready-made container combinations with bright annuals that are sure to bring a smile to your loved one’s face. Or you can design a container that is customized to their tastes—whether it’s with favorite colors or edible plants. Annual flowers, veggie containers and herb gardens can all be grown easily in containers on porches and backyard patios or balconies in garden-level apartments or high-rise condos.
  • Hanging baskets
  • For even more space-saving ability, consider a hanging basket. If your loved one doesn’t have a green thumb, there are plenty of low-maintenance houseplants or succulent options in containers. Even small cactus and succulent gardens can still provide color. Not only do many have colorful blooms, but the plants themselves can be found in shades of red, pink, blue, and violet.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

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