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Posts Tagged: moisture

Ready for frost or freeze?

frost or freeze

It’s been warm this week, but along the Front Range another frost like we had last week could come with little notice at any time. If you haven’t yet winterized your sprinkler system, do it now—or call a professional to get on their schedule soon. Hard freezes typically involve temps at 28 degrees or below for a minimum of 4 hours. A frost can occur at or below the freezing mark of 32 degrees if the humidity is high.

If you see a frost warning, here are three things you can do: 

  1. Cover tender annual veggies and flowers. Use fabric household items such as towels and sheets to cover plants and hold in warmth. Place tomato cages over plants to support the fabric if plants might break under the weight of fabric and snow. Snow is a good insulator to hold in warmth, but heavy snow on top of fabric can also crush plants beneath it. Avoid using plastic to cover plants as it will not protect against frost.
  2. Harvest selected plants. Cut potential losses by harvesting tender plants like basil and any plants you don’t want to risk losing. Basil can be placed in a vase of water to prolong its shelf life or dried.
  3. Protect the sprinkler system. If your sprinkler system has not yet been winterized, protect the backflow prevention device, which is the U-shaped device above ground usually located near the foundation. Because it is above ground, this device is vulnerable to freeze damage and costly repairs. Identify it now, and gather supplies to have on hand in case of freeze. Then, when cold temperatures are predicted:
  • Wrap the backflow with a blanket or heavy towel for insulation.
  • Cover it with a plastic garbage bag to keep moisture away from the pipes.
  • Tape the plastic bag in place around the base with duct tape.
  • Disconnect hoses from spigots.

The next morning, remember to uncover plants so they and the soil can enjoy warming sunlight. Protective covering for the backflow can remain in place until your system is winterized. 

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Care for your trees

Care for your trees
  • It takes a little effort to help your landscape ease into the fall and winter. Hopefully you’ve already winterized your irrigation system or scheduled your sprinkler blowout. If not, take a minute today to get it done or get on a professional’s calendar before they book up. Then, turn your focus to preparing trees for winter.
  • Ideally, you should try to prune your trees when they have gone dormant. Pruning shade trees helps them better handle the snowfall and strong winds of winter storms—especially if you have dead or damaged branches hanging around from previous storms. Take care of them before they become a hazard to people or property.
  • Once your trees have gone dormant, it’s a good time to prune suckers and water sprouts. For branches that you can’t easily reach from the ground, ask for help. If you don’t have proper safety gear to protect yourself or can’t prune while standing with both feet on the ground, it’s time to call in a pro. Tree pros have the equipment and the expertise to do the job properly.
  • One exception: Do not prune any spring-flowering trees, shrubs or perennials just yet—late winter or early spring is best for plants like fruit trees or lilacs.
  • Keep in mind that you are preparing your trees for winter, but that doesn’t mean you can completely stop caring for them when the cold sets in. They still need moisture. If the temperatures are above freezing, you can—and should—safely water your trees and shrubs.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Heat and smoky skies continue

Record-breaking high temperatures aren’t the best conditions for growing vegetables. The heat, and smoke from wildfires, aren’t good for the gardener, either. Take care of your garden and yourself with these tips.  Caring for heat-stressed veggies  •	Check soil moisture often and water so soil remains uniformly moist.  •	If your plants wilt during the hottest part of the day, know that this is their way of coping with the heat. You should see them perk up in the evening as temps cool.  •	Apply mulch around plants to keep the soil cool and to retain moisture.   Heat safety tips for humans •	Avoid working in your garden during the midday heat. Harvest your veggies in the morning when it is cooler.  •	Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water.  •	Try to work in the shade. A hat with a wide brim can protect your face.  •	If you wear a mask, remember that cotton is more breathable than synthetic fabrics.  •	If your mask has a filter pocket, a PM2.5 filter can add some protection on days of poor air quality due to smoke.   Our landscapes can be an extension of our homes and a place to socialize and relax. But if the temperatures are high and air quality is low, it’s better for your health to spend a little more time indoors until conditions improve.

Record-breaking high temperatures aren’t the best conditions for growing vegetables. The heat, and smoke from wildfires, aren’t good for the gardener, either. Take care of your garden and yourself with these tips.

Caring for heat-stressed veggies

  • Check soil moisture often and water so soil remains uniformly moist.
  • If your plants wilt during the hottest part of the day, know that this is their way of coping with the heat. You should see them perk up in the evening as temps cool.
  • Apply mulch around plants to keep the soil cool and to retain moisture.

Heat safety tips for humans

  • Avoid working in your garden during the midday heat. Harvest your veggies in the morning when it is cooler.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water.
  • Try to work in the shade. A hat with a wide brim can protect your face.
  • If you wear a mask, remember that cotton is more breathable than synthetic fabrics.
  • If your mask has a filter pocket, a PM2.5 filter can add some protection on days of poor air quality due to smoke.

Our landscapes can be an extension of our homes and a place to socialize and relax. But if the temperatures are high and air quality is low, it’s better for your health to spend a little more time indoors until conditions improve.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Slower is smarter

Slower is smarter
  • Smart technology can help you save money, conserve water, and keep your landscape looking great. As we kick off Smart Irrigation Month, we’ve got a tip for using technology to do just that: water slowly.
  • If water is applied too quickly, it can run off into the street or sidewalk instead of being absorbed into the soil and getting to the roots of your plants. Smart irrigation regulates pressure, ensuring water has a chance to soak into the ground.
  • Using a smart irrigation system with weather- and soil-moisture-based controllers allows your system to automatically adjust the watering schedule based on conditions at your location. That customization can go a long way to lowering your water bill and ensuring that your plants don’t get too much or too little water.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

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