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Posts Tagged: bestyard

2022 plants of the year

2022 plants of the year

Each year, the National Garden Bureau (NGB) chooses its plants of the year in several categories: annuals, perennials, bulbs, shrubs, and edible plants. This year they also added a houseplant to the roster.

Below are their picks for 2022. Take some time to learn more about these trendy plants and plan to add them to your own landscape in the new year:

  • Gladiolus (bulb) – Dramatic flowers grow from these bulbs (corms, to be exact) each summer. Fun fact: Gladiolus is the official flower of the City of Greeley, once known as “Glad City.”
  • Lilac (shrub) – Lilacs produce beautiful flowers, a wonderful fragrance and are drought-tolerant too.
  • Phlox (perennial) – Phlox is a North American native wildflower that will give you showy spring flowers.
  • Verbena (annual) – NGB chose annual varieties of verbena for 2022, but we like the perennial varieties that are native to Colorado, like Glandularia bipinnatifida.
  • Salad greens (edible) – Red lettuce, chicory, kale, arugula, spinach…this category is big, diverse, and delicious. There are even some greens that grow wild in Colorado and can be foraged. Find an expert to help you forage the right plant and avoid illness through misidentification.
  • Peperomia (houseplant) – As the name suggests, this diverse family of plants comes from the pepper family.

Talk with a landscape or garden center professional to find the best on-trend plant for your landscape’s conditions. Learn more about the categories above at the NGB website.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Need spring color right now

spring

After recent snows gave them a dose of moisture, and with temperatures heating up along the Front Range, early spring bulbs are popping up in landscapes and giving us a hint of the color to come. Crocuses, hyacinths, even some daffodils, and tulips can be spotted in gardens and flower beds.

The warm days might inspire you to add some color to your landscape. However, keep in mind that April in Colorado could still bring us heavy snowfall or even a freeze. Wait at least six weeks to plant most annuals.

If you must plant flowers soon, consider cool-hardy pansies.

  • When purchasing, check with garden center staff that the flowers are ready to plant. Pansies should be hardened off before putting them in the ground. If they have been kept outdoors at the garden center, they are probably hardened off and ready to plant.
  • Pansies that have not yet been hardened off need some protected outside time to get used to the outdoors. They need to adjust to night-time temps more than they need sunshine. Keep them outside on the patio in a protected area for about five nights before planting. If there is a frost or hard freeze, bring them indoors.

Once planted, pansies are frost hardy but will be seriously damaged by a hard freeze. If temps fall below 28 degrees, protect the plants from freeze damage like you would annuals in the early fall. Cover them with household items like sheets, blankets or towels – not plastic.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

 

Children Benefit from Gardening

Children benefit from gardening

 

  • Children who grow their own vegetables are five times more likely to eat them, according to a 2015 study. Whether it’s at school or at home, gardening can benefit their health and wellbeing in many ways.
  • Consider involving your children in planning your garden, and garden alongside them when it’s time to plant. A 2005 study found that elementary school children who participated in gardening activities scored much better on science achievement exams compared to those who did not do any gardening activities. Those who worked in the garden with their parents were more likely to eat more vegetables as they grow older.
  • Let them select veggies, herbs, and flowers they would like to grow. Get them involved early in the process to increase their investment and help them learn. Planning a garden can help them practice math skills and expose them to the science of plants.
  • Teach them the value of veggies. At harvest time, weigh some of your harvests and write down how many pounds of zucchini, tomatoes, or other vegetables your young gardener has grown. Then go to the grocery store or grocery store app, find the current price of these items and help them do the math. Turn a math exercise into a source of pride knowing they’ve grown $5 in green beans.
  • Gardening connects us with Mother Nature, influences environmental stewardship, and is an ongoing lesson in a healthy lifestyle and good nutrition. Plus, children who spend time in green settings have improved creativity, imagination, cognitive function, and intellect.
  • In the remaining winter days, plan your garden and if you have children at home invite them to join you. You will all reap the benefits this summer and onward.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

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