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Dec 12, 2022

You all are the best

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Nov 11, 2022

They are doing a good job getting everything under control.

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Nov 8, 2022

Great service with great staff.

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Nov 14, 2022

All good

- Janet

Nov 8, 2022

BestYard have done our fall leaf clean up for a few years now and we really appreciate this service!! We have a dozen trees in our small backyard so over the years we have more and more leaves as we get older. BestYard are good at communication and getting the job done!

- Margeret

Nov 2, 2022

It was quick and our lawn looks great!

- Paul

Nov 8, 2022

Wonderful job, team. The fall yard cleanup was perfect and the house looks great again!

- Trent

Oct 27, 2022

Excellent service!

- Tonyetta

Oct 26, 2022

Thanks Weed Man for aerating our lawn! The guys were fast, friendly, respectful of directions and most of all, did a great job of taking care of readying our lawn for winter and into the spring. Thanks so much for texting the day before to remind us of appointment!

- Ryan and Roxanne

Oct 25, 2022

Excellent customer service!!

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Posts Tagged: spring

Need spring color now? Plant some pansies

If you’re really feeling the itch to get out and garden, consider planting some cool-hardy pansies.

When you go pick out your pansies:

  • Check with the garden center staff that the flowers you are purchasing are ready to plant.
    • Pansies should be hardened off before putting them in the ground.
    • They are probably hardened off and ready to plant if they have been kept outdoors at the garden center.
  • Be aware that pansies that haven’t yet been hardened off need some protected outside time to get used to the outdoors.
    • They need to adjust to night-time temps more than they need sunshine.
    • Keep them outside on the patio in a protected area for about five nights before planting. If there is a frost or hard freeze, bring them indoors.
  • Keep an eye on the temperatures at night. Once planted, pansies are frost-hardy but will be seriously damaged by a hard freeze.
    • If temps fall below 28 degrees, protect the plants from freeze damage like you would annuals in the early fall.
    • Cover them with sheets, blankets, or towels (but not plastic).

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Spring snow

Springtime in the Rockies is usually a roller-coaster ride of nice days with warmer temps and colder days that bring heavy snows.

And March, as we all know, tends to be the snowiest month. For many plants, this transition time into spring can be the most challenging time of year. Snowfalls from this point forward tend to pack more moisture, and that added weight is more stressful on plants.

Here are some coping strategies to help your plants:

  • Deciduous trees:

Damp snow will cling to every branch and twig, and the cumulative effect can lead to cracked and broken limbs. If it’s possible to reach high in the tree with a long pole – such as a broom handle that has an extension, it’s a good practice to gently shake snow from the tree. Be sure to work from the bottom of the tree upward, so that when snow falls from the higher branches it does not add more weight to already snow-laden lower ones.

Even later storms that drop snow on trees that have started to leaf out will hold more snow as it clings to the leaves. Gently shaking limbs in these storms is even more critical. If there’s a hard freeze after trees break bud – either leaf bud or flower – it will normally kill those buds. Leaves will come back from a secondary bud, but flowers will not bud again and this will also mean fruit loss. The good news is the freeze will also kill seed buds on trees like ash and elm that drop seeds that require clean-up later.

  • Shrub care:

Many herbaceous shrubs have weak wood and long, pliable branches that make them susceptible to wind and snow damage. Examples include Russian sage, golden elder, sumac, pussy willow, blue mist spirea and dark night spirea.

Any branch that has been broken by the weather (and this includes trees) should be pruned back. Those rips and breaks are an open invitation to pests and disease of all kinds.

  • Protect these plants with timely pruning:

A little maintenance now can save more work and treatment costs later.

  • Ornamental grasses:

Most people prefer to leave dried ornamental grasses standing in the garden for the winter because of the beauty provided by their shape and swaying plumes. Under heavy snows, however, many of these grasses can be crushed, so they should be protected or pruned beforehand.

  • Broken and bent grasses:

These grasses won’t bounce back to their upright shape, so they should be cut back. Cutting these plants back after a March snowfall is actually good timing since it’s best to have old growth well out of the way before new shoots emerge.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Did you plant bulbs yet for next spring?

If you haven’t planted bulbs yet for next spring, there may still be time.

Planting now gives them time to develop roots before the ground freezes.

It’s an easy project as long as you know a few things to do – and not do – when planting.

Do:

  • Choose a location that is well-drained and gets plenty of sun.
  • Plan your planting around bloom time. Daffodils and crocuses will appear early in the season, while tulips will come along later.

Check with your bulb seller to learn the expected bloom times for each variety.

  •  Mix it up with more than just tulips and daffodils. Consider early-blooming snowdrops (Galanthus), which produce small white flowers that hang like bells and spread easily.
    Also consider late-blooming giant allium (pictured above), an ornamental onion that features purple flowers atop tall stalks.
  • Water your bulbs right after you plant them. This will help them settle into the soil and establish roots.

Do not:

  • Use the time-consuming method of spacing bulbs and planting them one at a time in rows.
    If a bulb does not bloom, you’ll end up with “holes” in your display.
    Try grouping them in pockets of 10-12 bulbs for a burst of color next spring.
    Dig a hole or trench 3 times deeper than the bulb height.
  • Plant all bulbs the same way. Large bulbs such as tulips and daffodils should be spaced 6 inches apart, so you’ll need about 5 bulbs per square foot.

Space smaller bulbs such as crocus and grape hyacinth or miniature daffodils about 4 inches apart.
You will need 8 small bulbs per square foot of garden area for those.

  • Forget to fertilize and top-dress. Help your bulbs establish roots with a fertilizer high in phosphorous used when planting. Then top dress the beds with shredded wood mulch or mulched leaves.

Then wait patiently for spring, when your efforts will be rewarded with beautiful blooms.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Dealing with wind damage

Dealing with wind damage

This week has certainly been a windy one! The part of your landscape that can take the most wind damage is also one of the most important—your trees. They provide shade and keep buildings cool. They clean the air of toxins, and they produce much of the oxygen that we breathe. So what are the best ways to address damaged trees and potentially cracked limbs to keep them from becoming a liability?

Inspect your trees, and as you do:

  • Be aware that the tree’s age will likely impact how it weathered the wind and that not all issues are easily visible. While young trees typically do not sustain serious damage, mature deciduous trees not only can be seriously damaged but have problems that aren’t obvious to an untrained eye.
  • Be wary of cracks and splits in the limbs. Broken limbs pose grave threats to people and property. Often, split limbs may be hanging on by a thread, so to speak, and these “hangers,” may not be so readily noticed. A little more wind or late spring snow can send them crashing.
  • Look more closely for hangers if there has been some obvious damage to a tree. Cracked limbs can be more difficult to see. One tell-tale sign that a limb is cracked is that it is bending down and/or resting on a limb below.

What to do with cracked branches:

  • Most cracked branches continue to live. In spite of the cracks, nutrients will still move through the branch to keep offshoot branches and leaves alive. The tree will try to callous over the wound to “heal,” but the bark will not grow back together, and the limb will remain a hazard.
  • If you have large deciduous trees or think you have trees with cracked branches, consider having them inspected by an arborist or landscape professional. Play it safe and remove wind-damaged limbs before they become a liability.

What to do with split trunks or large branches:

  • High winds can also cause tree trunks or branches to split vertically or even uproot the tree. As with broken limbs, splits can be hazardous and need to be dealt with right away.

Simply sawing off a limb behind the break won’t be aesthetically pleasing or healthy for the tree. It’s critical to call in a qualified arborist or maintenance professional to remove broken limbs so that they are cut properly for the long-term health of the tree.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Gifts for the plant lover

Gifts for the plant lover
  • This Sunday is National Poinsettia Day. Poinsettias are a great gift for this time of year. While they are not edible and could cause mild illness, they aren’t poisonous to kids or pets. Use them to decorate your home without fear but know that it can take some effort to keep them alive and healthy in Colorado. If the gift recipient isn’t a dedicated plant lover, you might consider a different, hardier gift plant.
  • If indoor houseplants are more their speed, consider a snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata), which does well even with a little neglect. It can handle a chilly night or low light conditions, making it versatile to place in nearly any room of the home.
  • For a gift they can keep outdoors in a container or plant in their landscape when spring comes, consider Rocky Mountain juniper, a native evergreen that is beautiful and aromatic. Outdoors it can withstand Colorado’s cold, harsh conditions.
  • A green gift is a nice way to give a friend or loved one a bit of nature during the winter months.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Do your trees need a blanket?

trees need a blanket

Were you one of the many people who planted new trees during the pandemic? If you’ve got a young tree with thin bark, you should consider wrapping it for the winter.

  • Why wrap a tree?

Colorado’s big temperature swings can cause frost cracks or split bark. Our sunny winter days can cause sunscald on tree bark that is left exposed after leaves fall. Using a tree wrap can protect the vulnerable bark of young trees against the harsh Colorado climate. Trees like linden, maple, fruit trees and honey locust often have thin bark and may need protection.

Even if your tree has suffered damage from the season’s first frost, wrapping now could prevent further damage. Remove the tree wrap in April or early spring or when the threat of freeze has passed.

  • What to use for tree wrap?

You can find tree wrap, often made of paper, at garden centers. It is not recommended that you crochet or knit a tree wrap from yarn. Not only is it time-consuming and costly, but it could also harm the tree. Wrap the trunk up to the first branches.

For evergreens like arborvitae that might suffer damage or split, you might consider burlap wrap to protect them.

  • Consult a professional

The best way to ensure proper winter tree care is to consult with an arborist or landscape professional who can help you make the right tree care decisions based on experience and by assessing the current conditions.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Did you plant bulbs yet?

plant bulbs

If you haven’t planted bulbs yet for next spring, there may still be time. Planting now gives them time to develop roots before the ground freezes. It’s an easy project as long as you know a few things to do – and not do – when planting.

Do:

  • Choose a location that is well-drained and gets plenty of sun.
  • Plan your planting around bloom time. Daffodils and crocuses will appear early in the season, while tulips will come along later. Check with your bulb seller to learn the expected bloom times for each variety.
  • Mix it up with more than just tulips and daffodils. Consider early-blooming snowdrops (Galanthus), which produce small white flowers that hang like bells and spread easily. Also consider late-blooming giant allium (pictured above), an ornamental onion that features purple flowers atop tall stalks.
  • Water your bulbs right after you plant them. This will help them settle into the soil and establish roots.

Do not:

  • Use the time-consuming method of spacing bulbs and planting them one at a time in rows. If a bulb does not bloom, you’ll end up with “holes” in your display. Try grouping them in pockets of 10-12 bulbs for a burst of color next spring. Dig a hole or trench 3 times deeper than the bulb height.
  • Plant all bulbs the same way. Large bulbs such as tulips and daffodils should be spaced 6 inches apart, so you’ll need about 5 bulbs per square foot. Space smaller bulbs such as crocus and grape hyacinth or miniature daffodils about 4 inches apart. You will need 8 small bulbs per square foot of garden area for those.
  • Forget to fertilize and top-dress. Help your bulbs establish roots with a fertilizer high in phosphorous used when planting. Then top dress the beds with shredded wood mulch or mulched leaves.

Talk with a landscape or garden center professional about the right care for the specific bulb varieties you choose. Then wait patiently for spring, when your efforts will be rewarded with beautiful blooms.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Care for your trees

Care for your trees
  • It takes a little effort to help your landscape ease into the fall and winter. Hopefully you’ve already winterized your irrigation system or scheduled your sprinkler blowout. If not, take a minute today to get it done or get on a professional’s calendar before they book up. Then, turn your focus to preparing trees for winter.
  • Ideally, you should try to prune your trees when they have gone dormant. Pruning shade trees helps them better handle the snowfall and strong winds of winter storms—especially if you have dead or damaged branches hanging around from previous storms. Take care of them before they become a hazard to people or property.
  • Once your trees have gone dormant, it’s a good time to prune suckers and water sprouts. For branches that you can’t easily reach from the ground, ask for help. If you don’t have proper safety gear to protect yourself or can’t prune while standing with both feet on the ground, it’s time to call in a pro. Tree pros have the equipment and the expertise to do the job properly.
  • One exception: Do not prune any spring-flowering trees, shrubs or perennials just yet—late winter or early spring is best for plants like fruit trees or lilacs.
  • Keep in mind that you are preparing your trees for winter, but that doesn’t mean you can completely stop caring for them when the cold sets in. They still need moisture. If the temperatures are above freezing, you can—and should—safely water your trees and shrubs.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

Stay out later

Stay out later
  • Imagine yourself relaxing on the terrace with a mug of tea or apple cider as you enjoy the cooler nights of autumn in Colorado. But fumbling in the dark with a mug of hot liquid is not a good idea. And candles or torches can be a hazard in our fire-prone state.
  • Despite continuing warm temperatures, shorter days can limit the time we spend outdoors this fall. One way to extend the time outdoors is with landscape lighting. It’s an investment in safety and curb appeal, and it can add to your enjoyment of your outdoor living space.
  • Pathway lights make it possible to navigate your landscape safely. Patio lighting can make your yard attractive and cozy past sundown. Plus, technological advances like LED bulbs and quality solar-powered fixtures have made landscape lighting more efficient than ever.
  • Talk with a landscape professional about the right lighting to enhance your landscape and improve your time outdoors this fall.

Click “DO IT FOR ME” to request a FREE quote.

Source: customer-service@bestyard.com in collaboration with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado

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